Friday, July 27, 2007

Who Is Most Likely to Survive?


Looking back just a few decades and seeing what a small percentage of writers from those days are still read today (if their books can even be found) makes me wonder about some of the major bestselling writers of our own era. I've chosen six authors who have made loads of money, sold tons of books, etc., but who have all received criticism, to one degree or another, for what they write.




What do you think...and why?

Which of these authors, if any, is most likely to still be in print 100 years from today?
Danielle Steele
Stephen King
JK Rowling
James Patterson
Dean Koontz
Tom Clancy
pollcode.com free polls


Note: I forgot to include a "none of the above" choice, so if that's your choice, just say so in a comment.

12 comments:

  1. I would have voted for ~both~ King and Rowling if the poll had let me.

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  2. Deciding on only one is a tough choice, I agree. I think it's a choice here between one writer with a long history of accomplishment in several areas vs. one with tremendous success in one area on one subject. It's an interesting choice, though, isn't it? :-)

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  3. King, Rowling and *maybe* Clancy. One bestselling author of today for whom antiquarians a hundred years from now will be scratching their heads and saying "This guy was a bestseller?": Mitch Albom.

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  4. I honestly don't think any of them will but King and Rowling are the top of the list.

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  5. I agree with you about Albom, Pete. I've been wondering about that for a while already. :-)

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  6. That's pretty much my feeling to, jpatsy. I think they have the best shots, King because he has written so much, with such variety, and because of all the movies made from his books. Rowling has to be considered a pretty good possibility just because of the huge numbers she sells in and because so many children are entranced with her at the moment. That she buy her a several generations of staying in print, I think.

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  7. I think Rowling has slightly longer staying power than King, just because she's influenced an entire generation and endowed them with a common set of vocabulary (like Muggles, Dementors, etc.).

    King? I'm not so sure.

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  8. I'll echo those that tried King and Rowling. Maybe it'll just be as a historical novelty, but I think there will be still be some people delving back into their work.

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  9. Isn't this comparing apples and oranges? Harry Potter is kid lit, and while I don't know all the others, I assume they are all adult literature. This probably makes a difference in their staying power. The fact that HP involves a school will probably help it stay popular among school librarians.

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  10. The list has definitely been boiled down to those two, Jill, in about the ratio that I expected, in fact.

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  11. Agreed, John. King will probably be the 22nd century's version of what we call "pulp fiction" today. I hope that his better, more serious, work doesn't disappear, however.

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  12. I don't see it so much as a comparison of "apples and oranges," Sylvia, because all of these writers have huge audiences as of this date. And I wonder if more adults aren't reading Rowling than children?

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