Sunday, February 12, 2012

Its Amazon vs. Everyone Else in the Publishing World

Here's a bit more on Amazon Print Books vs. the rest of the Publishing and Bookseller World.

The Barnes & Noble decision not to sell Amazon-published books in its bookstores has been applauded (and duplicated) by two Canadian booksellers: Books-A-Million and Indigo.  In addition, the American Booksellers Association (ABA) has decided to boycott the books.

Too, according to this article on thenextweb.com, Publishers Weekly has reported that the ABA-owned IndieCommerce company will not be listing any of the Amazon-published titles in its database.  Spokesman Matt Supko had this to say about the decision:
"While Amazon is seeking to distribute its print catalogue through conventional means, it seems that they are simultaneously pursuing a strategy  of locking in e-book exclusives which other retailers are not allowed to sell.  IndieCommerce believes that is wrong."
Whether any of these decisions has a significant impact on Amazon's business strategy remains to be seen, of course.  But it is becoming very obvious that the rest of the book world is not willing to sit back and allow Amazon to work its way toward a bookselling monopoly uncontested.  This is getting more and more interesting every day.

9 comments:

  1. I saw this coming ...it in itself is not a surprise, but what the outcome from all the backlash is will be. =)

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  2. It has definitely been interesting to see how this latest thing with Amazon has been unfolding. I wonder if all the pressure will be enough to get Amazon to play fair(er)...

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  3. I'm currently following the news on some blatant copyright infringement in Amazon's Kindle store: http://dearauthor.com/features/book-deals-features/news-and-deals-attention-possible-infringement-alert-on-amazon

    If having other stores not carry their print books doesn't hurt Amazon, it's possible that a lack of copyright infringement prevention tools could. Then again, there are times Amazon seems as untouchable as Google.

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  4. Wow, Amazon has already taken down the books. I do wonder, though, what's to stop the person/people from setting up a new account and doing it all over again.

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  5. It's good to see Amazon getting so much resistance, IMO, Keebler. But I wouldn't bet against them at this point. They always seem to come out on top, don't they?

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  6. I doubt it, Meagan. I can just imagine the staff of lawyers on both sides looking for all the angles on this thing. We'll have to wait and see if either side really can claim a win when it's all said and done.

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  7. Wow, Library Girl, you're right. That was astoundingly quick on Amazon's part. Looks like they knew they were very exposed by leaving it up...makes me wonder why they don't self-police themselves a little more effectively up front.

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  8. I applaud the Chapters/Indigo decision!
    I have a vested interest in their survival here in Canada since I practically live at their stores!

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  9. I was happy to see that your favorite bookstore chain was doing the same thing, Cip. Let's hope it works out well for them.

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